Happy holidays, everyone! Layla here.

Christmas just passed, and we are ready to embrace 2021. I think we can all agree that 2020 has been one heck of a year, but here at Intersected we have so much to be thankful for. 

This summer, Skye and I initiated a project that would help inform our respective communities on topics relating to racial equity. Beginning in June as a subsection of Katelynskyebennett.com with three curious and passionate writers (shout out to Sophia), Intersected has grown, becoming its own publication. We are nothing but proud and thankful for how far we have come.

Encouragement for the Intersected team.

Within the last six months, we published 25 posts with the help of a diverse group of guest writers. We are also grateful for our readership — we received over 7,000 views within four months of transitioning to our new platform. 

We were there early in the pandemic and at the height racial tensions, spurred to action by the killings of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor and the momentum for justice that we saw in our communities. 

We engaged with race as it relates to disability, refugees, depression, and veganism, to name a few topics. At the time of the Presidential election, we supported our readers with a non-biased view of each candidate’s racial equity platform. We have heard and amplified the voices of the Black, Latino, Asian, and Jewish communities.

Heading into the new year, we look forward to the continued pursuit of racial equity through writing, discussion, and action. I am excited about the upcoming collaborations with new and existing writers, the expansion of our marketing efforts, and ultimately contributing to make the United States a more equitable and just place.

Photo by Kelly Lacy on Pexels.com

Finally, as you’re gearing up your 2021 New Year’s resolutions, here are some suggestions specifically regarding racial equity.

1.       Research the key policies and legislation related to your interests. With a new administration elected to the White House, there are predictions of great reform. It may be a good opportunity to advocate for your cause. Consider drafting a policy memo, writing a letter, or joining an advocacy group.

2.       Keep tabs on your local elections. Yes, it will be another 4 years until the next presidential election, but there are even more important local elections happening almost every year. Who is running for city council, judge, or mayor? It takes a body of people to make our government and to pass legislation, not just the President. The local positions have a direct impact on you!

3.       Engage with social issues that may be a bit outside your wheelhouse. For me, I am obsessed with health equity (hence the pursuit of an MPH), but my goal for this year is to learn more about and actively engage with members of the LGBTQ community.

4.       Finally, engage with opposing perspectives. With social media algorithms and tight social circles, it is easy to hear only from those who think like you. Sometimes we get so caught up with our own side of things we make every other option unfathomable. 

To combat this, go on a virtual coffee date with that one friend who has a different worldview. Seek to understand why they believe what they do. Come ready to listen. Try to understand before being understood.


If you’re interested in writing for us, feel free to email us with your topic idea or submission at intersectedblogproject@gmail.com. If you’d like to read our researched perspective on a particular topic, contact us! We deeply appreciate the support of our readers and are constantly inspired by the everyday leaders and heroes in our community.

We wish you a very happy new year! 

With prayers for health and safety,

Layla & Skye

Skye and Layla. Photo taken before COVID.

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